A Valley News Publication

The Twin States apparently hate these v specific foodstuffs*

*According to the internet, which means it must be true, because they can’t put anything on the internet that isn’t true.

So TIL there’s a dating app called Hater that matches people not on their mutual interests, but on their shared hatreds, because people typically form strong bonds when they unite over a common hatred. Welp.

Anyway, Hater recently pulled together the most despised foods in every state to make, as Buzzfeed put it, a “hate-filled map.”

The Eastern U.S. "Hate Map," food edition. (Courtesy Hater, via Buzzfeed)

The Eastern U.S. “Hate Map,” food edition. (Source: Hater, via Buzzfeed)

New Hampshire opted for expensive cocktails which, OK, sure (live free or die, y’all), but Vermont’s pick was spray cheese, to which I say

What do you think of the results? Do you hate ’em or love ’em? Sound off below!

Dartmouth College releases statement on history lecturer’s comments on use of violence in anti-fascism

Dartmouth College has put out a statement on comments made by Lecturer in History Mark Bray on a recent episode of Meet the Press. Here’s Dartmouth College’s statement (the “free speech” link is theirs, as well):

Recent statements made by Lecturer in History Mark Bray supporting violent protest do not represent the views of Dartmouth. As an institution, we condemn anything but civil discourse in the exchange of opinions and ideas. Dartmouth embraces free speech and open inquiry in all matters, and all on our campus enjoy the freedom to speak, write, listen and debate in pursuit of better learning and understanding; however, the endorsement of violence in any form is contrary to Dartmouth values.

Here’s the Meet the Press segment in question, which is a little less than six minutes long:

Happy 109th birthday, Hazel

Yesterday, while you were all staring at the sun (in appropriately protective eye gear) or capturing crescent-shaped shadows (which looked pretty awesome), Sunapee Cove resident Hazel Nilson was turning 109 years old.

Hazel Nilson, with her son, Bob, is pictured on her 109th birthday on Aug. 21, 2017. (Photo courtesy Makenzie Munoz)

Hazel Nilson is pictured on her 109th birthday on Aug. 21, 2017. (Photo courtesy Makenzie Munoz)

 

Here’s a video I put together in advance of Hazel’s 108th birthday in 2016. Hazel spent her working career as a fitness teacher and shares those skills at Sunapee Cove.

Happy birthday, Hazel!

When it comes to the comments section, Wired finds that Vermont is very trolly and NH is not*

*On a particular commenting platform in a 16-month period that can’t really tell the whole picture, but just a slice of it. In any case, as a comment moderator, I’m not sure how I feel about this.

According to Wired and Disqus, an online commenting platform, 12.2 percent of the comments made on Disqus platforms in a 16-month period were hostile (the highest percentage in the nation). In New Hampshire, that figure was 4.7 percent, the lowest percentage in the nation.

 

Read more about their methodology and descriptions of “hostility” at the link, and note that this only covers Disqus platforms, not other places such as Facebook.

Other notable findings, according to Wired and Disqus: The most hostile time of day is 3 a.m. and the most “talkative” is 9 p.m. So stay off the internet in the middle of the night?? Or just like, always????

Are you eclipsed out yet or what?

The eclipse happened. Read all about it. Plus about a bazillion photos from the Upper Valley and around the world.

Ella Dahlstrom,8, of Hartford, Vt., and Becca Girrell, of Lebanon, N.H. view the solar eclispe at the Montshire Museum of Science, in Norwich, Vt., on Aug. 21, 2017. About 1,300 people came to the museum to see the eclispe. (Valley News – Jennifer Hauck) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Caleb Zuckerman, of Norwich, looks at the eclipse through a pinhole box he made on Aug. 21, 2017 at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vt. Tracy Zuckerman his mother is on the left also viewing the eclipse. John LaCrosse, of Hanover, N.H., had made a pinhole box as well. (Valley News – Jennifer Hauck) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Using a piece of pegboard the lunar eclipse is projected on pieces of paper at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich, Vt., on Aug. 21, 2017. (Valley News – Jennifer Hauck) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Big Ben has bonged its last bong for quite some time

British icon Big Ben, known for its booming bongs, will stand quiet until 2021 as it undergoes planned restoration, according to The Guardian. It rang its last bell on Monday.

The decision to silence the landmark didn’t come lightly, but ultimately workers’ safety won out: They’d go deaf if the bell was allowed to ring while they made the renovations, House of Commons officials said.

A large group turned out on Monday to witness and hear Ben’s last bong before its hiatus. Many onlookers were visibly moved, including Labour MP Stephen Pound, who shed a tear as the bell made its parting peal.

“Bong-o gone-o, that’s so wrong-o,” Pound told reporters as he arrived in the courtyard. As the final bell rang, Pound called the sound “misery in the key of E”.

He then expressed a hearty dose of British skepticism, presumably when a reporter tried to comfort him with the fact that Big Ben would bong again in just four years, and that it still will ring on certain holidays and events in the meantime. (This guy is a quote machine, btw.)

Pound said he doubted that the chimes would return on schedule in 2021. “They’re not going to be back in four years. Have you ever known any government project come in on time or on budget?” he said.

If you, like Pound, can’t wait four years to hear the bell toll, you can get your fix from the unofficial Big Ben Twitter account, which has been going strong since 2009:

Crescents in Lebanon, Hanover and Hartford Village, created by trees, a colander and window panes

In addition to our video from VINS and photos from the Valley News — plus more in tomorrow’s paper — check out all these cool crescent photos contributed by readers in downtown Lebanon, Hartford Village and Hanover! (Photos used with permission.)

Shadows created by the eclipse are seen on the Lebanon Mall on Aug. 21, 2017. (Photo courtesy Cam Cross.)


The camera was set at the base of a multi-paned window in Hanover, and the separate pieces of glass created the trail of reflections. (Photo courtesy Matt Mazur)


A colander creates crescent-shaped shadows in Hartford Villege on Aug. 21, 2017. (Photo courtesy Bethany Fleishman.)


As seen from the Upper Valley Food Co-op in White River Junction. (Photo courtesy Graham Robinson)

 

 

Got more to share? Comment on our Facebook page.

You only have to wait seven years to see the next eclipse, ICYMI

If you missed this afternoon’s eclipse, don’t fret: There’s gonna be another one in less than a decade, which is a much better than the 38-year gap that preceded today’s.

The Washington Post‘s graphics department pulled together this nifty little image showing which states will see the next eclipse, which will take place in seven years. The good news is we’ll be much closer to its path, which should make for even better viewing.

At its peak, the eclipse eclipsed all productivity at the Valley News

Valley News Publisher Dan McClory, left, and Editor Martin Frank take a look at the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Valley News office in West Lebanon, N.H.

Valley News Publisher Dan McClory, left, and Editor Martin Frank take a look at the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Valley News office in West Lebanon, N.H. (Valley News – Geoff Hansen)

Valley News cops and courts reporter Jordan Cuddemi views the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Valley News office in West Lebanon, N.H.

Valley News cops and courts reporter Jordan Cuddemi views the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Valley News office in West Lebanon, N.H. (Valley News – Geoff Hansen)

Valley News night editor Amanda Newman takes a peek at the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Valley News office in West Lebanon, N.H.

Valley News Night Editor Amanda Newman (hey, it’s me!) watches the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017, at the Valley News office in West Lebanon, N.H. (Valley News – Geoff Hansen)

In case you hadn’t heard, there was a solar eclipse today.

And while the Upper Valley wasn’t in the path of totality, it was still pretty cool to see (with protective eyewear, of course).

Not ones to miss a historic news event, Valley News employees gathered out on the lawn to catch a glimpse.

Meanwhile, in Burlington, Seven Days writer and Editor Paul Heintz took to Twitter to document that staff’s viewing party, which was not unlike our own.

Happy Monday, everybody

It’s a new week. Make the most of it.

Here’s a little pick-me-upper that Valley News graphic artist Shawn Braley saw on Route 132 in Sharon over the weekend.

Route 132 in Sharon. (Photo courtesy Shawn Braley)

Woodstock rally counters demonstrations of hate

Paulina Ochoa, of Philadelphia, holds a sign board as Jane Curtis, 99, of Woodstock, Vt., writes “I stand for Woodstock values” before the start of a vigil organized by the Woodstock Social Justice Initiative in Woodstock, Vt., on Aug. 19, 2017. Ochoa’s daughter, Alex Donahue, 7, made her own sign to bring. “I’m a marcher,” said Curtis, who also was at the Montpelier demonstration the day after President Trump’s inauguration. “What else can you do?” (Valley News – Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Read more.

Eclipse-watching events in the Upper Valley for Monday afternoon’s big event

Kay Wyatt in her observatory. (Steven Wyatt photograph)

If you can’t be like Kam Wyatt, who moved to Depoe Bay, Ore., 15 years ago to be in the the path of Monday’s solar eclipse, then here are some local locations where there will be public viewing parties, courtesy of the Valley Calendar.

Added to this list on Monday:

As a reminder:

Plus, some new stuff I learned recently, about maintaining the safety of your dogs …

 

 

… and cameras.

Have fun, y’all!

 

The pigs in Thetford, they didn’t do so great against the bear

🙁

Via the Thetford listerve this morning:

. BEWARE Bear
From: mary Bryant <mb.gravityhill@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 08:53:38 -0400

 

Dear Neighbors,
I have three recent bear incidents to report. Not sure if it is the same
bear or not. I live north of Tucker Hill Rd. and 132 intersection. Last
Sat. our neighbor had one pig killed by a bear and another was mauled. The
Game Warden confirmed it was a bear attack. My neighbor also heard of
another pig on the other side of Thetford on 113 was killed by a bear. I
do not have clarifying details that it was a bear attack. Last night I was
driving home on Union Village Rd. (about 3 miles from my house), it was
still quite light outside, and just before Sweetland Farm I saw 3 groups of
folks looking in the field where animals graze on Sweetland Farm. As I
drove nearer the field I saw a bear running in the field and the sheep
running away. I talked to two of the groups and they were keeping watch
and doing what they could to discourage the bear. I cannot say this is the
same bear that killed our neighbor’s pig. I did report this sighting to
the Norwich police and requested they pass on the incident to the Game
Warden.

 

Maybe unrelated, but 3 summers ago a bear circled our house in early
evening, came to the front door after it was yelled at and looked in our
window-very bold. Then it went to the garage and TOSSED a trash can that
was empty.

 

For what it is worth just be aware of a potentially bold bear who will
attack farm animals and possibly not so fearful of people.

 

Be Safe,

 

Mary Bryant

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