A Valley News Publication

WaPo interactive: The anatomy of a food truck

Erik Almestica, left, serves Paula Nulty, of White River Junction, a maple Korean street taco and short ribs from VT Munchies, the food truck he runs with long-time friend Garrett Wilson, middle, at Colburn Park in Lebanon, N.H., Tuesday, May 8, 2018. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

This seems relevant given all of the food truck news lately.

I truly cannot keep up with all the food trucks opening in the Upper Valley these days

FOOD. TRUCK. MANIA.

The Hanover High School Broadside reports that Martha’s On a Roll is now open in Hanover.

The Valley News reported earlier this month about the VT Munchies food truck and two food truck festivals this summer, one of which is still to come next month in Lebanon. (We also told you about that on UV INDEX, for anybody keeping score, although our headline was perhaps less traditional.)

According to the Valley News article …

Food trucks are one of the fastest growing segments in the food industry, according to foodtruckoperator.com. In 2012, food trucks in the U.S. generated $650 million in revenue; in 2017, revenue jumped to some $2.7 billion. They have the ease of mobility, adaptability of menu and can target their customers through their smartphones. They also offer less expensive eating options for consumers.

Our GIF-laden report on the August 2017 debut of the Taco’s Tacos food truck became one of our most-read posts of the year. People were also pumped about JUEL Juice + Smoothies.

And the excitement when Pnomh Penh opened its food truck in 2016 seems like a distant memory! (Pnomh Penh now has a brick-and-mortar shop.)

Erik Almestica, left, and Garrett Wilson, both of White River Junction, work together in the tight space of their VT Munchies food truck while parked at Colburn Park in Lebanon, N.H., Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Almestica has been a cook at Dartmouth College’s Thayer Dining Hall, and Wilson grew up in A.J.’s Restaurant, owned by his aunt. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

 

 

Upper Valley food trucks highlighted in the Valley News

Like we’ve been saying, we’ve got food truck festivals in our sights, starting this Saturday in Woodstock. Read more in today’s Valley News.

Garrett Wilson, part owner of VT Munchies, center left, greets Eddie Moran, part owner of Tacos Tacos, center right, while waiting in line at Boisvert’s Country Kitchen at Colburn Park in Lebanon, N.H., Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Wilson took a moment away from his food truck to talk with other vendors and try some of their food. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Polka Dot Diner takes a step toward reopening; former West Lebanon Library building for sale

The Polka Dot Diner is seen on Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

The Polka Dot diner building is a step closer to reopening after its new owner won site development plan approval on Monday night from the Hartford Planning Commission.

The move could lead to a reopening of the postage stamp-sized restaurant, which closed four years ago, after interior renovations authorized by the site plan are done.

Reopening the Polka Dot building roughly will follow the opening of two other new storefronts on North Main Street: Little Istanbul, a shop owned by Tuckerbox owners Jackie and Vural Oktay that will sell imported items and handcrafts from Turkey; and Juel Juice & Smoothies, a juice and smoothie bar owned by Julie Sumanis and Elena Taylor, who operate a juice cart of the same name.

One of the interior views of the former West Lebanon Library, which developer David Clem has on the market for $795,000. (Courtesy Snyder Donegan Real Estate Group)

Right across the river, developer David Clem has again placed the old West Lebanon Library building on the market, after an earlier attempt failed to attract a buyer.

The building on Main Street was listed earlier this month with a $795,000 asking price, and is being marketed as an “incredible office for an assortment of businesses, especially for a doctor, attorney or thriving tech company.”