A Valley News Publication

Bernie Sanders: Cardi B knows what’s up

Two weeks ago she dropped her highly anticipated debut album, Invasion of Privacy, and performed on Saturday Night Live. This week she got a shout-out from U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. Such is life when you’re Cardi B, the Bronx rapper who shot to stardom with her megahit Bodak Yellow.

Cardi’s initial statement came as part of an April 9 GQ profile, wherein she told a reporter that she loves political science and government, and is particularly enamored of former U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, also known as FDR, for his work establishing Social Security as part of the New Deal. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law in August 1935.

Here’s Cardi on FDR, from the GQ story:

“He’s the real ‘Make America Great Again,’ because if it wasn’t for him, old people wouldn’t even get Social Security.”

Fast-forward to this week, when Sanders quoted (well, quote tweeted) Cardi B, saying she was right when she spoke out about Social Security. (No, I don’t think he read the GQ profile.)

He then followed up with a tweet thanking the rapper for drawing attention to the topic, and reiterated in a video that he thought she was spot-on re: Social Security.

Cardi, who responded on Instagram, was v excited about the senator’s mention.

Oooooommmmmmggggg😱😱😱😰😰BERNIE SANDERS!!!

A post shared by Cardi B Official IG (@iamcardib) on

Kansas won’t let this dog run for governor


The Hill on Tuesday reported that a dog who recently tried to launch a gubernatorial campaign was informed he is not eligible to run because he is a dog, which, rude.

According to the article, Hutchinson, Kan., resident Terran Woolley entered Angus, his 3-year-old wire terrier, in the governor’s race after “news reports surfaced that the state does not have requirements governing who can run for the office.”

The state, however, quickly stepped in and ended Angus’ political career before it even began.

“A dog will not be allowed to file and put its name on the ballot,” said Bryan Caskey, director of elections for the Kansas Secretary of State’s Office.

How dare you squash his hopes and dreams like that, Kansas?! He is clearly a very good boy.

Twitter users were understandably outraged by the news.

Vermont Electric Coop chief says she will launch a campaign for governor

Christine Hallquist, the CEO of Vermont Electric Coop, says she intends to challenge Gov. Phil Scott.

Christine Hallquist, the CEO of Vermont Electric Coop, says she intends to challenge Gov. Phil Scott.

Christine Hallquist, the CEO of Vermont Electric Coop, has announced she plans to run against Republican Gov. Phil Scott in November.

Hallquist said she will run as a Democrat, making her the third such challenger. Environmentalist James Ehlers and Ethan Sonneborn, a 13-year-old middle school student, also plan to run, according to VtDigger. The three will compete for the right to take on Scott, who has said he will seek a second term.

(Can we take a moment to appreciate that a 13-YEAR-OLD is running for governor?! Holy cow. He means business, too: Check out his Twitter account, where he regularly posts statements related to the race. He even issued a statement on Hallquist’s candidacy. P.S.: If you’re wondering how he’s able to run, it’s because Vermont does not have a minimum age requirement for gubernatorial candidates. See the full requirements here.)

If elected, Hallquist would become the first openly transgender governor in the country — and American history.

With such a diverse pool of candidates, it’s clear this race will be one to watch.

New Hampshire House passes initial marijuana legalization bill

The New Hampshire House took a step toward legalizing recreational marijuana in the state.

New Hampshire Public Radio reports the House voted, 207-139, in favor of an amended legalization bill. From the story:

The amended bill would permit adults to possess up to three-quarters of an ounce of marijuana, 5 grams of hashish, and certain marijuana-infused products. Adults could also cultivate up to six pot plants at home.

Speaker Gene Chandler said the bill now goes to the House Ways & Means Committee, according to NHPR.

The passage marks a rebuke of U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who on Thursday made it easier for prosecutors to enforce federal marijuana laws in states that have opted for legalization of the substance. (Read more about that here.)

The Vermont House approved the legalization of recreational marijuana that same day, and lawmakers have said the Vermont Senate could vote on the bill as soon as tomorrow. Republican Gov. Phil Scott has signaled he would sign it into law if it passes.

Democrat Doug Jones defeats Republican Roy Moore to win Ala. Senate seat

Democrat Doug Jones speaks Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. In a stunning victory aided by scandal, Jones won Alabama's special Senate election, beating back history, an embattled Republican opponent and President Donald Trump, who urgently endorsed GOP rebel Roy Moore despite a litany of sexual misconduct allegations. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Democrat Doug Jones speaks Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. In a stunning victory aided by scandal, Jones won Alabama’s special Senate election, beating back history, an embattled Republican opponent and President Donald Trump, who urgently endorsed GOP rebel Roy Moore despite a litany of sexual misconduct allegations. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

A Democrat has claimed victory in Alabama’s special election to fill its U.S. Senate seat, with Doug Jones handily defeating Republican candidate Roy Moore.

The Associated Press called the race for Jones just before 10:30 p.m. on Tuesday, making him the first Democrat elected to such office from Alabama since 1992.

Jones, 63, is a former U.S. attorney best known for prosecuting two Ku Klux Klan members for the 1963 bombing of a Birmingham Baptist church, which killed four girls. The bombers were not tried until the 1990s.

He has never held elective office.

Moore has been facing calls to step aside ever since The Washington Post published a blistering article alleging he had pursued teenage girls when he was an assistant district attorney in his early 30s in Alabama.

President Trump had voiced broad support for Moore, as did former White House strategist Steve Bannon.

Read more here.