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The Perseid (that’s “Purse-y-id,” according to NASA) meteor showers are set to peak this weekend, offering ample opportunities for viewing, according to Time Magazine. Here, a quick guide.

WHEN TO WATCH

Time reports the best times to see the meteor showers are Saturday and Sunday nights, when you should be able to see 60-70 meteors per hour.

Some meteors will appear lower in the sky as soon as it’s fully dark out—around 9:30 p.m. local time. But the best time to watch the shower is in the pre-dawn hours of 3-5 a.m. when the moon has set and Perseus is high in the sky.

HOW TO WATCH

If you want to take see the meteor show, you should aim to head somewhere super dark and free of light pollution or large buildings, according to the article. “No special equipment is needed, just patience,” Time reported.

Of course, if you prefer to view from the comfort of your own home or already have plans and might miss the show, you can catch the live stream here on Youtube.

HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH THE METEOR SHOWERS

This is where it gets a little tricky, and where some equipment might be necessary. (You probably won’t capture this lights show on your iPhone.) From the article:

Anyone using a real camera should consider setting it up on a tripod in order to avoid the blurry shots that can result from shaky hands. For best results, aim your camera toward Perseus, manually focus a wide-angle lens, use a remote shutter release or self-timer, and employ NASA’s 500 rule to calculate the optimal exposure time.

If anyone does snap pics of the shower, send ’em our way!

FILE – In this Thursday night, Dec. 13, 2012, file photo, a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Geminid meteor shower over Springville, Ala. The Geminids meteor shower hits its peak on Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, but a full moon will outshine the celestial show this year. (Mark Almond/AL.com via AP, File)