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Via Poynter:

In the weeks leading up to Kavanaugh’s confirmation this week, which senators are expected to vote on this morning, fact-checking projects like The Washington Post Fact Checker and Snopes started debunking viral social media rumors about Kavanaugh, Ford and sexual assault. Journalists at outlets like The New York Times, which recently launched an anti-misinformation project, and BuzzFeed News also documented wide-reaching hoaxes.

 

“Our emphasis in covering the hearings is giving readers clarity and context about what they’re seeing and hearing,” said Angie Holan, editor of (Poynter-owned) PolitiFact in a message. “It’s an important moment in the confirmation process, but we can’t assume that all readers are familiar with the issues or process.”

 

Still, the hearings have proved to be a little harder to fact-check than the traditional political event. And that’s because there’s still a lot that journalists don’t know, Holan said.

Click here to read the full piece with links to fact-checking projects.

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Christine Blasey Ford, seated, at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Thursday, September 27, 2018 on Capitol Hill. (Melina Mara /The Washington Post via AP, Pool)