A Valley News Publication

Just a library patron catching up on the day’s news, nbd

A very good set of pictures by the Howe Library staff on Instagram.

(That’s @howelibrary.)

And the original photo on our own Instagram.

(Which is @vnewsuv, btw.)

 

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Donlon Wade, of #CanaanNH, holds an anti-pipeline banner with Patricia Greene, also of Canaan, as about 50 supporters gather for a rally on the steps of City Hall in #LebanonNH on Wednesday evening. Petitions against Liberty Utilities’ proposed West Lebanon natural gas plant and pipeline were presented after the rally to the City Council. “It’s our futures that are most in jeopardy,” said Celia Barnett, a Lebanon High School junior who collected 115 signatures at school. The other petition circulated by the group Sustainable Lebanon collected 1,059 signatures of Lebanon residents. Following 40 minutes of public input at the start of the City Council meeting, Mayor Sue Prentiss said the council would discuss the issue at its next meeting. (Valley News – Geoff Hansen @geoff_hansen) #uppervalley #upval #vnewsuv #photojournalism #protest #rally #pipeline #lebnh #naturalgas #skeleton #october #603 #💀

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It’s gonna be super cold tonight; here are some snow photos from around the Upper Valley

Sorry y’all. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Via WMUR:

Thank you to folks who answered the call for snow photos from last night and this morning! Here they are.

Photo courtesy Rebecca Genovese. Taken in Hartland (Jenneville).

Photo courtesy Sara Saint Amand. Photo taken in Grantham.

Photo courtesy Sara Saint Amand. Photo taken in Grantham.

Photo courtesy Chrissy Richardson. Photo taken in West Lebanon.

Tricks and treats in the Upper Valley through Halloween night, plus popular candies in the Twin States

Emily Tevere, 18, of Enfield, left, takes a break to check her phone and Samantha Farrell, 17, of Canaan, middle, for a snack as Molly Meagher, 15, of Enfield, right, keeps up the zombie act for passing cars and trick-or-treaters on the Canaan, N.H. green Monday, October 31, 2016. The group of Mascoma Valley Regional High School classmates have been dressing up as zombies to pass out candy on the Canaan green every Halloween for the past four years. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Mark your calendars.

The Upper Valley’s got plenty going on when it comes to ghosts, goblins and the like in the coming weeks. Click here for an events roundup by the Valley News’ events experts, including Calendar editor Liz Sauchelli, assistant editor Eleanor Kohlsaat and Entertainment Highlights writer David Corriveau.

And start flexing your candy-distribution arm.

If you’re wondering what to buy, the website CandyStore.com has shared some data about where it sells the most Halloween candies in the United States, broken down by state and brand.

So to be clear, this is not the most popular candies in each state; just which candies are sold the most by this particular distributor in each state in the two months leading up to Halloween.

Here’s the 2017 numbers:

And here’s those stats for 2018:

New Hampshire New Hampshire
1. Snickers (63,876 lbs) 1. Starburst (67,939 lbs)
2. Starburst (62,486 lbs) 2. M&Ms (61,343 lbs)
3. Salt Water Taffy (25,978 lbs) 3. Snickers (25,049 lbs)
Vermont Vermont
1. Milky Way (29,387 lbs) 1. Milky Way (31,822 lbs)
2. M&M’s (27,811 lbs) 2. Skittles (26,056 lbs)
3. Skittles (17,662 lbs) 3. M&Ms (15,344 lbs)

 

Dartmouth plans to unveil a single, streamlined sexual misconduct policy

The east side of Dartmouth College's campus is seen from the Baker Tower on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. The college currently is working on developing a single, comprehensive policy to deal with sexual misconduct. (Valley News - Charles Hatcher) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

The east side of Dartmouth College’s campus is seen from the Baker Tower on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. The college currently is working on developing a single, comprehensive policy to deal with sexual misconduct. (Valley News – Charles Hatcher) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Dartmouth College is in the process of developing a new sexual misconduct policy that will extend to all areas of campus life, according to a report published on Thursday in the Valley News. While specific policy details being considered by college President Phil Hanlon have not been released, the college has confirmed the new policy will apply to students, faculty and staff. From the story:

The campus already has a relatively new policy for students that is unified, in the sense that it applies to all forms of sexual misconduct. But (Geisel School of Medicine Dean for Faculty Affairs Leslie Henderson) said the campus also has various other, older policies on the books that address pieces of the puzzle. It’s time to align them, and bring them up to date, she said.

Students interviewed for the story largely seemed to be in support of a revised policy, which comes about a year after three professors in the school’s Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences were put on paid leave and barred from campus after sexual misconduct allegations surfaced. An internal review recommended that the professors — Todd Heatherton, Paul Whalen and Bill Kelley — be terminated; Heatherton retired, and Whalen and Kelley resigned as a result. The New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office, which also has opened an investigation into the allegations, said this week that the probe is ongoing.

Read the full story on the policy here.

Catch me at the “Tech Jobs in Journalism” panel at Vermont Tech Jam in Essex Junction, Vt., on Friday afternoon

Seven Days’ Cathy Resmer will be moderating the panel with four people whose jobs didn’t exist 10 years: Phayvanh Luekhamhan, director of business development, finance and administration at VTDigger; VPR reporter Liam Elder-Connors; Seven Days digital editor Andrea Suozzo; and yours truly, Valley News web editor and UV INDEX sandwich expert.

Here’s the description:

Vermont’s media outlets still employ reporters and editors, but they also need data crunchers, podcast editors, online community managers and web video producers. In this panel discussion, staffers from some of the state’s largest and most innovative media outlets explain what they do, where they learned to do it, and how they keep up with whatever’s next.

It’s all free! We’re in Room A at 3:30 p.m. Check out the rest of the lineup at the Vermont Tech Jam website.

It me.