A Valley News Publication

How about a little ukulele rendition of Elton John from Newport, N.H.?

Read more about the Sugar River Ukulele Club in an article written by Dan Mackie from this past Saturday’s Valley News.

Click here to read that story.

Geraldine Moore, of Newport, N.H., is a beginner on the ukuele. Moore was at a gathering with the Sugar River Ukulele Club in Newport, on Aug. 7, 2018 at the Richards Free Library. (Valley News – Jennifer Hauck) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

And also, I couldn’t NOT share this video of Elton John performing “Crocodile Rock” with the Muppets.

Singing crocodiles. Duh.

First person: Working at the Valley News when it launched in 1952

Beverly Chapin, née Way, sent us this scan of a clipping from the <em>Valley News</em>. The caption reads: "AT THE KEYBOARD in the perforating room of the Valley News yesterday was Pvt. Beverly Way, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Neil M. Way of North Hartland. Private Way, who was employed by the News at the start of publication in June, is now stationed at the leadership school, Fort Lee, Va. She visited the plant yesterday while home on Christmas leave. (News photo—Carroll)"

Beverly Chapin, née Way, sent us this scan of a clipping from the Valley News. The caption reads: “AT THE KEYBOARD in the perforating room of the Valley News yesterday was Pvt. Beverly Way, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Neil M. Way of North Hartland. Private Way, who was employed by the News at the start of publication in June, is now stationed at the leadership school, Fort Lee, Va. She visited the plant yesterday while home on Christmas leave. (News photo—Carroll)”

Remember a little while back, when local history buff Art Pease shared an article from the Hanover (N.H.) Gazette announcing the impending debut of the Valley News in June 1952?  If you don’t remember, you can check it out here.

That post led to something really special: Beverly Chapin, née Way, one of the people mentioned in the Hanover Gazette clipping, recently reached out to us and shared some of her memories from the Valley News’ beginnings and her life in the Upper Valley.

Beverly Way was born in Burlington in 1931, during the Great Depression, and grew up in North Hartland during World War II. She was one of 35 graduates with the Hartford High School Class of 1949. In 1952, she was 20 years old and had been working as a stenographer at the VA in White River Junction before she was referred to a teletypesetter operator job at this new newspaper that was about to start up, the Valley News.

She worked at the paper for a couple months before enlisting in the Women’s Army Corps. Her beau, Paul, had joined the Navy and proposed; when they wed, she became Beverly Chapin. After their time in the service, she and Paul eventually settled in Enfield and raised four children there.

Now 66 years after the Valley News’ founding, Beverly is about to celebrate her 64th wedding anniversary and 87th birthday. She and Paul have retired to North Carolina, about an hour outside Charlotte. Beverly’s sister lives next door.

Beverly emailed me after the initial post about Art Pease’s clipping, and we talked on the phone for some time last week.

“It was a very friendly atmosphere, there wasn’t a large staff at the time, and we just kind of all knew each other — by name, at least — and it was very sociable,” she said, recalling the Valley News’ original offices on Route 10 in West Lebanon. “Everything has totally changed, you’re not using linotype any longer. It’s all computerized.”

She joked: “I’m not as old as the aardvark, but technology changes quickly.”

She recalled how her father winterized a camp house on Lake Champlain, all the family could afford during the Depression, by tacking cardboard cartons on the wall. “You did what you had to do. We ate a lot of fish,” she said.

And when the family moved to North Hartland, their home didn’t have a telephone, so her mother would walk up to the farmer’s house nearby if she needed to make a call.

“I learned to type on a manual typewriter; now I have a whole computer setup, laptop, tablet,” Beverly said. “It’s nice to be able to share some of these things and to remind people that times have changed so drastically.”

It was so great to hear from someone who worked at the same business and lived in the same area as me during a very different time, especially now as our business continues to change, adapt and evolve (just look at this website!). Beverly first reached out by email, just to say she appreciated seeing the Gazette article, and I asked her what life was like back then; she responded by sharing memories and reflections from that time period. When we talked on the phone, she graciously agreed to allow those memories to be shared with all of you, as well.

Thanks so much, Beverly. It is much appreciated. You can read what she wrote below, along with some of the scans she sent of Valley News clippings from the time. (And another big thanks to Art Pease for sharing the clipping in the first place. You never know what you’re going to find when you share something like that!)

Memories of the Valley News’ earliest days and life in the Upper Valley, shared by Beverly Way

The caption says: "Pvt. Beverly J. Way (left), who recently received a loan from the Red Cross, makes the first contribution in the Ft. Lee, Va., WAC Training Center's Red Cross drive to Maj. Agnes Mashidlausky, chairman of the Center's Drive. The Red Cross loan enabled Pvt. Way to fly home for a family emergency. The drive started on March 1 and will continue throughout the end of the month. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Neil M. Way of Hartland, Pvt. Way was graduated from Hartford High School and prior to her enlistment in the WAC was employed by the Veterans Administration in White River Junction."

The caption says: “Pvt. Beverly J. Way (left), who recently received a loan from the Red Cross, makes the first contribution in the Ft. Lee, Va., WAC Training Center’s Red Cross drive to Maj. Agnes Mashidlausky, chairman of the Center’s Drive. The Red Cross loan enabled Pvt. Way to fly home for a family emergency. The drive started on March 1 and will continue throughout the end of the month. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Neil M. Way of Hartland, Pvt. Way was graduated from Hartford High School and prior to her enlistment in the WAC was employed by the Veterans Administration in White River Junction.”

(From an email on Aug. 6, 2018)

Thinking about “time” and how did I manage to raise 4 children, garden, can, cook & bake from scratch and also sew when I had to teach myself most of those last 3, along with housework, etc., I realize not only was I younger but there was not much TV and no computer to distract. How life has changed!

I have been musing a great deal recently on days long gone, not just because I am old but because there have been reminders such as your article, searching family genealogy, the inevitable demise of individuals from my past, and talking with a 17-year younger sibling about our parents when they were younger, our brother who died in an accident when she was only 2, and life in our family that she missed since she was not yet born. Thankfully my memory so far has held up quite well and I can share much.

When the building was being erected on Route 10 in West Lebanon to house all operations of the Valley News and a staff being gathered I was a stenographer at the VA Center in White River in the Adjudication Division. This was post WW II when a surge of veterans were returning to a civilian life that had undergone major changes as a result of the war. Many went away as boys, came back men after horrific experiences and found “home” and “family” life was very different than they remembered. Many needed help and/or education to make the transition as well as medical and surgical treatment. I worked in the Vocational Rehabilitation and Education Division at the VA but eventually it was downsized so I was transferred to Adjudication, the legal branch charged with deciding disability levels and benefits for individuals with service-connected disabilities. That work load also became lighter over time. The attorney for the Rating Board knew I was thinking seriously of moving on and referred me to his friend Allen Butler, driving force behind establishing the Valley News.

I was hired and we started work weeks early to be trained on an entirely new technology, the teletypesetter, with a factory rep teaching us. Then we had some time to practice before first publication day. We worked on a keyboard much like the typewriter but with more functions as it punched a paper tape coded for the linotype machines which had also been modernized. In case you’re not familiar with the history, linotypes were originally set by hand with the blocks of letters, numbers, etc., that made up a line for printing. They were modified so that the tape was read and molten lead flowed onto a sort of tray and that formed the print a whole line at a time. If the tape had not been justified properly it could cause an overflow of the melted metal that really gummed up the huge linotype and had to be all cleaned out before continuing.

We worked in a small side room beside the main printing room. A young man named “Lindy” was in charge of the linotypes – as I remember there were 3 monster machines, one of which was for advertising only because of the graphics – and Lindy gave me a tour and full explanation when I goofed. That room was very noisy with machines that held the type faces, inked them and then did the actual print onto paper that came on huge rolls of newsprint (the unprinted paper) and it was cut into pages as it went. National and international news came in by wire and was converted to the lintotype function automatically. What we were doing was to set up all the local items back in the day when most towns and villages had a correspondent who sent in periodic columns of who was visiting from out of town to a town resident, local club doings and anything else that might be of interest. Or – how to be the village gossip and get paid for it. We also typed up the local news written up by the paper’s reporters and their feature articles and anything else such as editorials, local school news and events when most towns still had local schools.

No. 1: "North Hartland Girl Gets Promoted in WAC / FORT LEE, Va. — Private First Class Beverly J. Way, North Hartland, has been promoted to her present rank at the Women's Army Corps Training Center. / She enlisted in the WAC in July of last year and came to the Training Center for basic training. Upon completion of basic she was selected to attend the Leaders' Course to develop the leadership qualities which she displayed in earlier training. / Following graduation from Leaders' she received her present duty with the Leaders' Company L, as instructor. / A 1949 graduate of Hartford High School, White River Junction, she was employed in White River Junction as a clerk-stenographer at the Veterans' Administration." No. 2: "July 6, 1953 / PERSONALS / Visitor last week -- Pfc Beverly Way of Fort Lee, Virginia. Bev said she was an instructor in Leadership, liked it very much, and, to judge from her ship-shape appearance, Army life is certainly agreeing with her!"

No. 1: “North Hartland Girl Gets Promoted in WAC / FORT LEE, Va. — Private First Class Beverly J. Way, North Hartland, has been promoted to her present rank at the Women’s Army Corps Training Center. / She enlisted in the WAC in July of last year and came to the Training Center for basic training. Upon completion of basic she was selected to attend the Leaders’ Course to develop the leadership qualities which she displayed in earlier training. / Following graduation from Leaders’ she received her present duty with the Leaders’ Company L, as instructor. / A 1949 graduate of Hartford High School, White River Junction, she was employed in White River Junction as a clerk-stenographer at the Veterans’ Administration.” No. 2: “July 6, 1953 / PERSONALS / Visitor last week — Pfc Beverly Way of Fort Lee, Virginia. Bev said she was an instructor in Leadership, liked it very much, and, to judge from her ship-shape appearance, Army life is certainly agreeing with her!”

At that time there was a weekly paper, The Landmark, published in White River but the Rutland Herald and the Boston Globe were the main news sources available. Local radio was yet to come and TV news still years in the future.

The Valley News did well in a short time if memory serves. The delivery vehicles, usually private, picked up at the plant in the afternoon to get the papers into stores in time for evening homecoming and into roadside indvidual boxes along the way.

All through school years we learned state and national history, patriotism was part of life and honorable and encouraged. My father was a Navy veteran of WW I and followed the news of the world more than many, we had a “grade school” (now elementary school) teacher who included following the news of WW II as part of class work, and as a member of the marching town and school bands I was in countless Memorial Day and Armistice Day observances, and knew what they truly were about. My father worked at the VA hospital from the time it was getting ready to open in 1938, we heard President Franklin Roosevelt’s announcement of Pearl Harbor on the radio and father explained what it was about as much as a 10-year old could comprehend. In the following years a favorite uncle and a favorite cousin were drafted as were several others I knew less well because of distances. My father joined the neighbors in becoming Air Raid Wardens who did regular shifts staying up at night to monitor blackout curtains and watch for planes. They needed to be able to identify planes by outline both day and night and make reports by telephone so I studied the material also. My mother took me along to gatherings of village women In North Hartland where we all folded bandages at tables in the library as women were doing all over the country. The gauze came in precut to size but with raw edges, we folded in all four sides and had special metal blades to press the folded sections flat to be stacked and then they were returned to be sterilized and then sent to the war fronts and hospitals. There were no machines yet invented to do the cut, fold, count & stack automatically.

This was also a time of rationing of many items when we shopped with ration stamps as well as money, and gasoline was rationed. We had to use a special letter form to write to military so it could all be censored going both ways to prevent any spying or inadvertent disclosures that might be used by the enemies (such as the numbers of various military vehicles being shipped on open flat cars by rail from Canada and the Great Lakes region manufacturing plants through places like White River Jct. in our area to Atlantic coast ports to be shipped to Africa and Europe. As kids we used to watch the trains go by from the bank at top of our garden). All ages helped with the scrap metal drives. This country was very involved beyond the military.

It was the beginning of so-called women’s liberation because women were needed in the defense manufacturing industries, farming, food production to be shipped to troops and to our allies, all types of office jobs including those connected to anything to do with military or war efforts, and it impacted even child care for all those women who had children AND a regular job. The allies prevailed, war ended (sort of) and the troops returned to wives who had grown and changed as had the whole economic world. The men had changed in ways no one understood and we’re still learning.

It reads: "North Hartland Girl Promoted to Corporal / WAC TRAINING CENTER, Fort Lee, Va. — Cpl. Beverly Jean Way, daughter of Mr. and Mr.s Neil M. Way, North Hartland, has received a promotion to her present rank at the Women's Army Corps Training Center, Fort Lee, Va. / A graduate of Hartford High School and a former employe (sic) of the VALLEY NEWS, she enlisted in the Women's Army Corps in July, 1952, and, upon completion of the basic training course, she was assigned to the Leaders's Company, where she classified as a clerk-typist and instructor. / The WAC Training Center at Fort Lee, Va., is the nucleus of the Women's Army Corps. Here all new members of the corps are received, processed, interviewed, and trained for Army life."

It reads: “North Hartland Girl Promoted to Corporal / WAC TRAINING CENTER, Fort Lee, Va. — Cpl. Beverly Jean Way, daughter of Mr. and Mr.s Neil M. Way, North Hartland, has received a promotion to her present rank at the Women’s Army Corps Training Center, Fort Lee, Va. / A graduate of Hartford High School and a former employe (sic) of the VALLEY NEWS, she enlisted in the Women’s Army Corps in July, 1952, and, upon completion of the basic training course, she was assigned to the Leaders’s Company, where she classified as a clerk-typist and instructor. / The WAC Training Center at Fort Lee, Va., is the nucleus of the Women’s Army Corps. Here all new members of the corps are received, processed, interviewed, and trained for Army life.”

By the time the Valley News was born the US was involved in the Cold War against primarily Stalin, dictator of the USSR, to keep communism from overtaking the world and Korea was the battleground, a police action but never declared a war. The draft still existed to supply the military and the high school classmate I was seriously dating by then enlisted in the Navy. Months later I enlisted in the Women’s Army Corps after giving notice to Mr. Butler that he needed to find a new trainee for my job.

Army enlistments were shorter than Navy and Paul proposed just before I left the Army. We married back in Vermont, drove to California before the interstate systems were built and got to travel the old original Route 66 Chicago to California where Long Beach was home port for his ship. We’d settled into married life, I found a job with the Miss Universe Beauty Pageant headquartered then right in Long Beach at the oceanside Civic Auditorium, then the Navy started cutting back and decommissioned Paul’s ship. He was ordered to Japan shore duty his last 6 months on active duty and I stayed in Long Beach where he returned just one week before the birth of his first son.

As soon as the baby was cleared to travel we boarded at LAX and flew home to Vermont. To find an affordable place to live we settled in Enfield in Currier’s Mobile Home Park, later when the 3 offspring had all outgrown the length of their beds we found a large old farm house to buy in Etna. Years later we sold that large house because children will grow and leave home. We bought our “retirement home” back in Enfield Center with a small piece of beach on Mascoma although we were still working and years from retirement.

Housing prices were rising rapidly along with taxes, Paul was declared 100% disabled before retirement age and could no longer do our own upkeep on the house so we eventually sold, got a truck and RV and spent a while traveling and living in RV parks except when we returned to park in our son’s yard in Cornish for the summer. After travel lost its appeal we looked for a place to settle and ended in the Carolina’s where we had some family already living and where there is no snow to shovel, housing could be found that was affordable and taxes much lower. At 86 and 87 years old now and about 3 weeks from a 64th anniversary, we live where nature is a bit easier to cope with in the Piedmont region between mountains and coast and 3 family members live right next door and down the same street along with one in the next town. Paul likes it fine here but I shall always miss northern New England, things like spring lilacs, rhubarb and horseradish in the spring, the northern birds, birch trees, and even the snow and cold so I do get homesick at times. The RV is still in Mike’s yard but we are no longer able to make such trips. I’m just a displaced Yankee who still follows the news from “back home” and most thankful for the internet.

Ch-ch-changes in WRJ, as the Polka Dot sign comes down and the Phnom Penh sign goes up (video)

A man prepares to remove the Polka Dot sign in White River Junction, Vt., on Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018. (Maggie Cassidy photograph)

White River Junction! You’re movin’ so fast!

In May, we told you about plans for Lebanon-based Phnom Penh Sandwich Station to open a second location in White River Junction at the former Polka Dot Restaurant site.

This afternoon, those plans became more visible as one sign came down and the other went up.

Check out video from our Facebook page below.

But what will happen to the Polka Dot sign?

In an email Monday morning, property manager Tim Sidore said that the Polka Dot sign will be displayed inside the new Phnom Penh. And he said that “things are shaping up inside!” (No word on a target date for Phnom Penh opening.)

Building owner Mike Davidson noted that that’s the same setup as the old Gulf sign displayed inside Lucky’s Coffee Garage, which was one of his many re-development projects throughout the Upper Valley.

(This section about the fate of the Polka Dot sign was added to this post on Monday morning.)

Customers drink their coffee on Jan. 19, 2018, at Lucky’s Coffee Garage in Lebanon, N.H. Mike Davidson, who renovated the former Gulf gas station, said that the old Gulf sign displayed at the coffee shop is a template for how the old Polka Dot sign will be displayed at the new Phnom Penh restaurant in White River Junction, another project of his. (Valley News – Carly Geraci) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Of course, this scene played out against the backdrop of new construction.

Developer Bill Bittinger recently finished construction on that new building behind the restaurant, and it includes a mix of apartments and first-floor businesses, including JUEL Juice + Smoothies and Little Istanbul, a shop of Turkish wares run by the same folks who run the Tuckerbox Restaurant across the street. I can personally attest that JUEL Juice + Smoothies (which started out as a sweet little food “truck” and is now a full-on “modern apothecary cafe” with coffee, snacks and more) was bustling on Saturday!

So long, Polka Dot sign.

See you on the inside.

The Polka Dot building in White River Junction, Vt., on May 8, 2018, is one of the properties owned by developer Mike Davidson’s Execusuite. (Valley News – Geoff Hansen) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Lucky 7 News Quiz No. 15 is open through Aug. 23

If you win a pin, you could look like this.

SMARTPHONE & TABLET USERS

If you’re on an smartphone or tablet, please click here for a mobile-friendly link to the quiz!

DESKTOP USERS

Continue on to the quiz below! (Note: There’s a scrolly bar.)

LAST WEEK’S WINNERS

After two weeks of ace-less quizzes, we finally have another ace — in fact, we have two! Since we have been exclusively random winners the past two weeks, they are getting all of the pins this week. 🙂

THE WINNERS OF QUIZ NO. 14 ARE:

  • Karen Zook (ace!)
  • Lucinda Walker (ace!)

CONGRATS! Comment on our Facebook or email us at uvindex@vnews.com to let us know if you want to come by the Valley News to pick up your loot or if we should pop ’em in the mail.

THE CORRECT ANSWERS TO QUIZ NO. 14:

Q1. Upper Valley communities are being impacted as a result of recycling decisions made in which country?
A. China.

Q2. Which bridge was struck again this week, marking the second time this summer it has suffered such damage?
A. Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge.

Q3. Jeff Lear, the man shown cutting a tree in a recent B1 photograph, works for which company?
A. Trees, Inc.

Q4. Contributor Paul Keane wrote a Close-Up essay about the time he wasn’t sure if he was hallucinating when he saw what in the desert during a 1970s hitchhiking trip?
A. Weinermobile.

Q5. Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business has altered its admission criteria to include consideration of four virtues: Smart, accomplished, aware and _________.
A. Nice.

Q6. Who won the recent Shrine Maple Sugar Bowl?
A. Vermont.

Q7. Which TV personality recently visited Haverhill to celebrate the Food4Kids initiative put forth by Isidro Rodriguez?
A. Mike Rowe.

Courtesy photograph.

TELL YOUR FRIENDS!

They can find this page at www.vnews.com/lucky7 or uvindex.vnews.com/lucky7.

Meet the latest adoptable pets: Sirus, Mr. Meowgi, Honey, Robin, Ava

  • This is actually two weeks’ worth of adoptables, because I forgot to share last week’s here!
  • This is at least Robin the dog’s fourth time on the Valley News feature; could you be the home for him?
  • Click any picture to learn more.
  • We’ve always got listings at www.vnews.com/adoptablepets.

Click any picture to learn more:

Sirus.

Mr. Meowgi

Honey.

Robin.

Ava.

A space for people with depression to share photography: Barnard’s Tara Wray debuts the Too Tired Project

Tara Wray, of Barnard, Vt., sits at her kitchen table with her dog, Nighthawk, and some of her photos laid out on Monday, Nov. 20, 2017, at her home. Wray has launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund pre-sales for her hardcover photobook, “Too Tired for Sunshine.” (Valley News – Charles Hatcher) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

An Upper Valley photographer has worked with an independent photobook publisher to create a space for folks struggling with depression to share their photography.

Barnard resident Tara Wray made the announcement on Instagram yesterday: She is partnering with Yoffy Press to launch the Too Tired Project, on the ‘gram at @tootiredproject and described as a “new photo initiative that aims to help those struggling with depression by offering a platform for collective creative expression.”

I’m involved in the launch of a new project and I hope you’ll want to participate. . . It’s called the @tootiredproject and it’s inspired by the outpouring of people who have contacted me since my photobook came out to say they too use photography as a tool for helping cope with depression. Who knew!? . . The goal of the Too Tired Project is to help those struggling with depression by offering a platform for collective creative expression. We want to see your photos and get a dialogue going about mental health and art. . . We’ll post a few favorites on tootiredproject.com, but everyone can have a say on Instagram. Eventually, along with @yoffypress, we aim to put out a photobook of the work. . . Check out the site, and tag your photos #tootiredproject to submit. . . Please help spread the word.

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Really cool. She said:

We’ll post a few favorites on tootiredproject.com, but everyone can have a say on Instagram. Eventually, along with @yoffypress, we aim to put out a photobook of the work.

For Instagram, tag your posts with the #tootiredproject hashtag to be considered.

Wray wrote that the goal of the project was “inspired by the outpouring of people” who contacted her since the release of her photobook, Too Tired for Sunshine, which the Valley News wrote about last November:

There’s a nice-sounding folk theory that assumes a relationship between creativity and mental illness — Van Gogh’s ear seems to be the favored paradigm — but the truth is, this claim is unproven from a medical standpoint, and probably dangerous from a social one.

 

It might be more accurate to say that people with mental illness tend to see the world differently than the neurotypical. A person who is depressed, for example, might be more likely to notice the irony in a Rite Aid display of Mother’s Day bouquets that’s conveniently located next to the cleaning supplies, or how a bit of glazed doughnut got pinched off under the lip of its protective glass cover. They might find themselves inexplicably drawn to dogs looking out car windows, especially on damp or overcast days.

 

Tara Wray, the Barnard photographer and former filmmaker who has launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the production of her forthcoming* photo book, Too Tired for Sunshine, captures the world through just this lens. Wray has dealt with depression on and off for most of her life, she said, and both she and her book are matter-of-fact about the vicissitudes of living with the condition.

 

“Three hundred and fifty million people worldwide suffer from depression. It’s nothing to be embarrassed about,” she said during an interview at Jake’s, in Quechee, on a recent Thursday morning that surprised with snow. But she also doesn’t want to give the impression that she’s in a darker place than she really is, though she was experiencing depression when taking most of the photographs that appear in the book.

Read the full Valley News story here. *Since that story’s publication, the book has printed and is available for purchase at Wray’s website.

In an email Thursday evening, Wray said she and Yoffy Press have a rough timeline for the next photobook, possibly publishing in late 2019 or early 2020.

“So far the response has been incredible (and we just launched a few hours ago),” she said.

Take a look!

#Repost @jenniferyoffy ・・・ #tootiredproject

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@buckminsterbuck #tootiredproject

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