A Valley News Publication

Sorry for being a little bit quiet over here lately; we have been dealing with some ~news~

Yowza!

Click the image to read the full story from Wednesday’s Valley News.

Yes, as my partner here pointed out the other day, it’s true, I am taking on this new challenge. (Thanks so much, Amanda!)

So yeah, apologies for going MIA for a while but we’ve some ch-ch-changes going on over here and will do our best to update UV INDEX as much as we can as we handle ’em. Thanks for reading and thanks for your support.

Oh yeah …

And one more thing …

Thanks for the chips!

ICYMI: Episode 3 of the VN’s collaboration with CATV (Dartmouth lawsuit, N.H. mental health care)

John Gregg getting ready for the big stage … 

John Gregg at the CATV studio in White River Junction, Vt., on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

In episode 3 of the Valley News’ collaboration with CATV, news editor John Gregg talks with reporter Nora Doyle-Burr about a $70 million class-action lawsuit that seven female science students filed against Dartmouth College in mid-November, alleging sexual harassment and assault by three former professors.

Then, staff photographer James M. Patterson joins Gregg and Doyle-Burr to talk about the story of Mandy Dube, a Unity resident who sued the state of New Hampshire nearly five years ago in a different class-action suit brought on behalf of people with serious mental illness. Patterson has followed Dube’s story for 8 years and he and Doyle-Burr checked in with Dube — and the state of New Hampshire’s mental health care system — for a story in a recent edition of the Sunday Valley News.

Missing brown dog (kinda, sorta, not really) from Enfield

Julie Eckert reports on the Enfield listserve that a “canine” was recently taken. Description:

Brown. Small. Quite heavy. Taken at Enfield dog park end of Oct. before scarecrows taken down.
Village very disappointed. Faithful ambassador to the park. Made of wood and carpet. Missing from Enfield dog park scarecrow display. Excellent “stay” , will not respond to voice commands. Never jumps up or barks.

If you’ve got the dog, she’s asking you to bring it to 3 Shaker Blvd. in Enfield.

 

O, Hartland Christmas tree, o, Hartland Christmas tree

BYE!

++++ CLICK THE IMAGE FOR MORE PICTURES ++++ Christian Perkins, of White River Junction, Vt., at left, takes photos of a balsam fir tree being donated by Larry and Pat Fortier of Hartland,Vt., on Wednesday. Perkins works for Chippers Inc., a tree service that has been helping care for the tree. The tree will become the official state Christmas tree displayed at the capitol in Montpelier, where a lighting ceremony is set for Friday at 4:30 p.m. The tree was planted by the Fortier’s son Kevin about 30 years ago when he started studying landscape design in college. (Valley News – Rick Russell) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

We told you that this Hartland tree was gonna get cut down (and showed you its baby picture from 1990), and now it has happened!

(Sign up for the Daily 7 newsletter here.)

BTW, there’s a lighting ceremony scheduled for Friday at 4:30 p.m. on the Vermont Statehouse lawn in Montpelier. 

p.s. TOTALLY SEPARATE AND UNRELATED, but doesn’t the tree photo remind you of this whole scene?

Spectators watch as the lantern and spire of the Strafford Town House are lifted off the building by crane to be restored on site in Strafford, Vt., Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018. The estimated $107,000 restoration will take place in the coming months. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

#tbt to painting the clock tower in Lebanon in 1965

Pulled from the #valleynewsthrowback hashtag on the @vnewsuv Instagram!

The Lebanon city hall clock got a new coat of paint on June 7, 1965, as painters from Walter Painting and Decorating of Lebanon, N.H., did the honors high above the city square. (Valley News – Larry McDonald) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Hartland Christmas tree will represent the Upper Valley on the Vermont Statehouse lawn

The Fortier family tree, as seen on Route 12 in Hartland. (Photo courtesy Larry Fortier)

Breaking Christmas tree news! 

Larry Fortier, of Hartland, says that his family’s tree at their home on Route 12 has been selected to be this year’s Christmas tree on the Vermont Statehouse lawn. It will be removed from their home at 10 a.m. on Wednesday*, Nov.28, he said, and Gov. Phil Scott will light the tree in Montpelier on Friday, Nov. 30 at 4:30 p.m.

“We offered the tree to the state earlier this year,” Larry told me in an email, in response to my questions. “They have a team of two people that travel around in October to evaluate the trees that have been offered by various people. Our tree was not quite as tall as they normally choose but it apparently had the best shape. Anyone that wants to see the tree being removed is welcome.”

The Fortier home is at 95 Route 12 in Hartland.

We also have a “before” picture of the tree, thanks to Larry, who said the 1990 picture shows the tree “when it was planted by our youngest son Kevin.” Congratulations to the Fortier family!

The tree in 1990. (Photo courtesy Larry Fortier)

*The tree was originally scheduled to come down on Tuesday, but was postponed to Wednesday due to a snowy forecast.

Also, if you’re interested in a Christmas tree for your home, how does $5 sound?

Check out the news release we received recently from the U.S. Forest Service:

RELATED:

Fair point

Hawaii was a six-time winner of the poll, according to this video posted by Channel 5, which reports that Vermont actually tied with South Dakota.

Three cheers for elbow patches

They help you do journalism better.

From left to right: Alex Hanson, Geoff Hansen, Maggie Cassidy, Jim Kenyon.

Also helps you do journalism better: apple pie in the newsroom.

(Thanks, Marty!)

Mental health patient’s struggles to get treatment show gaps in the system

ICYMI in the Sunday Valley News, it’s worth taking the time to read this piece on Unity resident Mandy Dube, reported by Valley News reporter Nora Doyle-Burr and photographer James M. Patterson.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Mandy Dube, of Unity #NH, waits to plead not guilty to a charge of domestic violence in Newport District Court in June. As a result of the charge, a protection order required her to have no contact with her boyfriend, Chris Bailey, with whom she had just purchased a home. “I don’t want to get out of a punishment by using my mental health as an excuse. I want to be able to get help, so I can prevent that happening in the future. It was a mental health crisis. I understand that and I want to move forward,” she said. 🔹 It’s been nearly five years since the state of #NewHampshire settled a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of people with serious mental illness, including Dube. Just as the state has made some progress in improving mental health services since the settlement of the suit, Dube has made strides in maintaining her independence. But just as people in the #mentalhealth system say that the state has a way to go, Dube says she is not where she needs to be — largely because the state still is not providing the #support that she believes it should. 🔹 Full story at www.vnews.com/instagram. Link in profile. 🔹 (Valley News – James M. Patterson @james.m.patterson) #uppervalley #upval #vnewsuv #photojournalism #journalism #news #portrait #mentalillness #healthcare #courts #603

A post shared by Valley News (@vnewsuv) on

Throwback to Listen’s Lebanon Thanksgiving in 1988; plus, free Upper Valley meals on Thursday

We’re off on Thursday, so I’m posting this #valleynewsthrowback here on UV INDEX one day early.

This year, there are at least three free and public Thanksgiving meals happening in the Upper Valley on Thursday: Listen is hosting one at Sacred Heart Church in Lebanon (starting at noon), and there are also meals at Vermont Law School in South Royalton 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.) and the White River Junction VFW (noon-3 p.m.).

Full details on free meals and local turkey trots in this recent Out & About column.

And on to the #tbt!

Listen, a social-service organization based in Lebanon, N.H., held its first community Thanksgiving dinner on Nov. 24, 1988, at the Sacred Heart Parish Hall. Lebanon volunteers Susan Truman, left, and Pam Bennett join others in saying grace before the dinner begins. Seventy-five people ended up taking advantage of the dinner. Listen was prepared to serve up to 150 people, so the abundant leftovers will be distributed to area social service agencies for their weekly community dinners. (Valley News – Bill Conradt) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Listen, a social-service organization based in Lebanon, N.H., held its first community Thanksgiving dinner on Nov. 24, 1988, at the Sacred Heart Parish Hall. Volunteers Alan Emery and Friddie Labrecque, 8, of Enfield, N.H., carve up turkey in preparation for the feast. Seventy-five people ended up taking advantage of the dinner. Listen was prepared to serve up to 150 people, so the abundant leftovers will be distributed to area social service agencies for their weekly community dinners. (Valley News – Bill Conradt) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

 

PSA: Romaine lettuce not safe to eat due to E. coli outbreak

Romaine calm, everyone.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday warned U.S. consumers against eating romaine lettuce, which has been linked to a recent — and particularly serious — E. coli outbreak. As The Washington Post reported:

The CDC told consumers to throw away any romaine lettuce they may already have purchased. Restaurants should not serve it, stores should not sell it, and people should not buy it, no matter where or when the lettuce was grown. It doesn’t matter if it is chopped, whole head or part of a mix. All romaine should be avoided.

The CDC alert, issued just two days before Americans sit down for their Thanksgiving dinners, reported that 32 people in 11 states have become sick from eating contaminated romaine. Of those, 13 have been hospitalized, with one patient suffering from a form of kidney failure. The Public Health Agency of Canada has reported 18 people infected with the same strain of E. coli.

Tl;dr: Don’t eat lettuce, don’t buy lettuce and don’t hang on to any lettuce you already have until the CDC finds the source of the outbreak and declares it over. Also, be careful handling your turkey this Thanksgiving — there currently is a widespread salmonella outbreak linked to raw turkey.

ICYMI: This is why you’re supposed to clean the snow and ice off of your vehicle’s roof

Jasmine Nadeau of Plainfield, N.H., talks to Trooper Michael Catalfamo of the New Hampshire State Police following an incident where she said snow or ice blew off the top of a blue SUV in front her, smashing her windshield, on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, in Lebanon, N.H. She was traveling north on Interstate 89 between exits 18 and 19 when the accident happened. She was alone in her vehicle, a Nissan Rogue, and was uninjured.(Valley News – Rick Russell) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

From the Valley News:

A combination of snow and ice flying off the top of another vehicle shattered a woman’s windshield as she drove north on Interstate 89 in Lebanon today, according to New Hampshire State Police.

Jasmine Nadeau, of Plainfield, was not injured in the incident that took place between exits 18 and 19 at roughly 12:30 this afternoon.

She was alone in her vehicle, a Nissan Rogue.

New Hampshire State Police Trooper Michael Catalfamo said the windshield was struck by a “combination of snow and ice.” Nadeau said the vehicle was a blue SUV.

Shortly after the incident, Lebanon Police took to Facebook to remind motorists about clearing snow and ice from vehicles before driving.

“Often referred to as ‘Jessica’s Law,’ failing to clear snow and ice from the roof of your vehicle constitutes negligent driving and can be punished by a fine of up to $500 for the first offense,” police said in the post. “More importantly, clearing your roof can save lives as the frozen snow and ice can fly off while you’re driving and impact another vehicle.

#tbt, before video killed the radio star

As always, find more at the #valleynewsthrowback hashtag on the @vnewsuv Instagram!

Friends of the Hanover Schools were given a series of videotape demonstrations on Jan. 22, 1968. The videotape system would provide the schools with a file of of lectures and other school events for future reference. A final demonstration has been scheduled during a varsity basketball game. Here a technician adjusts focus of camera trained on teacher. (Valley News – Larry McDonald) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.