A Valley News Publication

Tonight: Chelsea-area residents’ input is needed in the community store discussion

The poster reads, “Setting a direction and taking action: The community store discussion continues @ Chelsea Town Hall, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m., May 22. Bring a small dish and your ideas. Input is needed re: type of business/store model; core functions of a store; store site location; funding, financing and resources; organizing a task force.” On Facebook @firstbranchcc; email jenna@vtrural.org.

From the Valley Calendar:

Chelsea community members are invited to work with a resource team of federal, state, business and nonprofit experts to identify next steps and resources to help envision a Chelsea community store. The meeting will be facilitated by the Vermont Council on Rural Development, in partnership with the Green Mountain Economic Development Corporation.

 

This meeting is a follow up to a community discussion on April 21 during which attendees expressed ideas and vision points on the structure, need and functions a store might serve and how to make sure it aligns with Chelsea’s existing needs and assets.

 

For more information, contact the Vermont Council on Rural Development at 802-225-6091 or jenna@vtrural.org, or email local representatives at firstbranchcollaborative@gmail.com.

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Equifax responds to Randolph librarian’s lawsuit

Equifax, the credit reporting agency that recently compromised millions of Americans’ personal information in a massive security breach, has issued a response to Jessamyn West, the Randolph librarian and activist who is suing the company to protest its compensation to affected consumers. (Read more about her lawsuit here.)

In its response, the company says it “denies each and every allegation” brought forth by West and “further denies that plaintiff is entitled to any of the relief set forth in her prayer for relief,” among other denials.

So what happens next? Per a tweet from West:

Jessamyn West, of Randolph, checks her mail in Randolph, Vt., Wednesday, September 27, 2017 and finds a return receipt for a small claims court summons she sent to an Equifax representative in Barre, Vt. West is taking Equifax to court after her personal information was stolen in a security breach. “I’m really surprised more people haven’t done this; it’s super-easy,” said West. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Randolph librarian, privacy activist sues Equifax

A follow-up to our earlier post: Jessamyn West filed suit against Equifax in Orange County Superior Court after learning that her personal data likely was accessed in a massive hack that the company reported earlier this month.

Jessamyn West, of Randolph, checks her mail in Randolph, Vt., Wednesday, September 27, 2017 and finds a return receipt for a small claims court summons she sent to an Equifax representative in Barre, Vt. West is taking Equifax to court after her personal information was stolen in a security breach. “I’m really surprised more people haven’t done this; it’s super-easy,” said West. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.