A Valley News Publication

Hold on to your hand-knitted hats: Fiber arts superstar Sam Barsky in Lebanon Thursday night

Sam Barsky.

Let’s get down to the knitty gritty, y’all. Totally delightful famous internet person Sam Barsky is coming to town!

Calendar editor Liz Sauchelli, aka the Valley News’ resident knitter-in-chief, flags to us that Barsky, who she describes as “kind of a huge deal in the fiber world,” will be at Scratch Supply Co. in downtown Lebanon Thursday evening.

The free public event takes place from 6 to 9 at Scratch’s shop on the pedestrian mall.

According to the Scratch Facebook event:

Sam will be bringing a selection of his sweaters, and will give a brief talk about his journey to becoming an artistic knitter. The evening will be open-house style, and we hope that you’ll be able to join us!

Let us know if you go. In the meantime, here’s a selection of Barsky’s Instagram posts (followers: 32,300+) showcasing some of the sweaters he has knitted since 1999, when he dropped out of nursing school for health reasons. (He’s also got photos on his Facebook page.) They are all pretty great.

RELATED:

Scratch has officially moved into its new space on the pedestrian mall in Lebanon

Woodland walking

#tbt: The injured robin named Bird adopted by Dartmouth photographers in 1968

Here’s my new favorite entry to the #valleynewsthrowback hashtag on the @vnewsuv Instagram. (For anyone keeping track, this was my previous favorite.)

Known simply as Bird, a wounded robin has been adopted by the Dartmouth Photo Bureau staff in Hanover, N.H., on June 27, 1968. Bureau secretary Irna Assura made an improvised wing sling to help it heal. (Valley News – Larry McDonald) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

A wounded robin adopted by the Dartmouth Photo Bureau staff in Hanover, N.H., on June 27, 1968, has taken to making noises like a sparrow due to the excessing number of sparrows that surround her new environment. (Valley News – Larry McDonald) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

At feeding time, a healing robin adopted by the Dartmouth Photo Bureau staff in Hanover, N.H., on June 27, 1968, will flit on the bellows of the studio camera for an afternoon nap and even become indignant when asked to move by photographer Al Olson. (Valley News – Larry McDonald) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Separate but kinda somewhat related …

I’ve been having an issue at my house this fall where sparrows are flying headfirst into my windows. One died, one flew away and one survived but was injured, so I brought that little buddy to VINS in Quechee.

While I was there, a VINS staff person told me about these mostly-transparent decals you can stick onto your windows to deter birds from crashing into them.

Apparently they are much more visible to birds than they are to us because of some kind of ultraviolet technology.

And they’re not necessarily needed year-round. The VINS staff person told me that they are particularly needed/effective at this time of year because it’s migration season.

Anyway, if you’re having a similar problem and you wanna try to save some birds, the stickers are available for sale at VINS and I have seen them at local businesses, as well. Brands include WindowAlert and Whispering Windows.

Wondering what it looks like? This is my window that has the stickers on it:

Just a library patron catching up on the day’s news, nbd

A very good set of pictures by the Howe Library staff on Instagram.

(That’s @howelibrary.)

And the original photo on our own Instagram.

(Which is @vnewsuv, btw.)

 

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Donlon Wade, of #CanaanNH, holds an anti-pipeline banner with Patricia Greene, also of Canaan, as about 50 supporters gather for a rally on the steps of City Hall in #LebanonNH on Wednesday evening. Petitions against Liberty Utilities’ proposed West Lebanon natural gas plant and pipeline were presented after the rally to the City Council. “It’s our futures that are most in jeopardy,” said Celia Barnett, a Lebanon High School junior who collected 115 signatures at school. The other petition circulated by the group Sustainable Lebanon collected 1,059 signatures of Lebanon residents. Following 40 minutes of public input at the start of the City Council meeting, Mayor Sue Prentiss said the council would discuss the issue at its next meeting. (Valley News – Geoff Hansen @geoff_hansen) #uppervalley #upval #vnewsuv #photojournalism #protest #rally #pipeline #lebnh #naturalgas #skeleton #october #603 #💀

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After 1,146 days at Lucy Mackenzie, Robin the dog has found his new family

Robin — a former stray and frequent face on the Valley News adoptable pets feature — finally has a home to call his own!

Robin <3

Lucy Mackenzie Humane Society announced on social media this morning that Robin has been adopted after 1,146 days (or nearly 3 years, 2 months).

Here’s Robin’s description from the Valley News adoptable pets features:

“Hi! My name’s Robin and I’m a 5-year-old neutered male mixed breed dog that came to Lucy Mackenzie as a stray.

 

“Life hasn’t always been easy for me, but I’m looking forward to starting over in my new home. I’m a fun-loving active fella that has tons of potential, and lots of love to give!

 

“Since I’ve been here, we’ve spent lots of time working on basic behaviors, like how to walk on a leash, sit and stay. I’ve come such a far way!

 

“I’d be the only animal in my ideal home, and my human would be committed toward continuing my training with me. It would also be nice if I wasn’t left alone for long amounts of time, as I’m much happier when I’m around my people.

 

“All I really need in life is a second chance.  If you’ve been looking for a new best friend, stop in and meet me today!”

Looks like he got that second chance. <3 Best wishes, Robin & family!