A Valley News Publication

#girlpower

Half off at the downtown Lebanon Listen thrift store as they prepare to move to old Bridgman’s store

Get on it! And/or wait for National Thrift Shop Day on Friday. 🙂 The sale runs through Aug. 28 and Listen is planning on opening in its new location in October.

RELATED:

Seems like as good a time as any to re-share the American Red Cross heat safety tips

All of the following is written by the American Red Cross. As a reminder, Lebanon announced cooling shelters are open through Friday.

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HEAT SAFETY TIPS

Some people are more at risk of developing a heat-related illness, including adults age 65 and older, those with chronic medical conditions, people who work outside, infants and children and athletes. Here are steps you should take in hot weather:

  • Hot cars can be deadly. Never leave children or pets in your vehicle. The inside temperature of the car can quickly reach 120 degrees.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
  • If someone doesn’t have air conditioning, they should seek relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day in places like schools, libraries, theaters, malls, etc.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat. Take frequent breaks if working outdoors.
  • Check on animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat. Make sure they have plenty of cool water.

HEAT EXHAUSTION Excessive heat can lead to sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. If someone is experiencing heat cramps in the legs or abdomen, get them to a cooler place, have them rest, lightly stretch the affected muscle, and replenish their fluids with a half a glass (about 4 ounces) of cool water every 15 minutes.

If someone is exhibiting signs of heat exhaustion (cool, moist, pale or flushed skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness, exhaustion), move them to a cooler place, remove or loosen tight clothing and spray the person with water or apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If they are conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition. If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, call 9-1-1.

HEAT STROKE LIFE-THREATENING Signs include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting and high body temperature. Call 9-1-1 immediately if someone shows signs of heat stroke. Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the person’s body by immersing them up to their neck in cold water if possible. Otherwise, douse or spray the person with cold water, or cover the person with cold, wet towels or bags of ice.

DOWNLOAD RED CROSS APPS The Red Cross app “Emergency” can help keep you and your loved ones safe by putting vital information in your hand and settings for more than 35 different severe weather and emergency alerts including heat advisories and excessive heat warnings. The Red Cross First Aid App puts instant access to information on handling the most common first aid emergencies at your fingertips including heat-related emergencies. Download these apps by searching for ‘American Red Cross’ in your app store or at redcross.org/apps.

High temps prompt Lebanon officials to announce public cooling areas

Sitting here in the A/C, it’s easy for me to forget that it’s very not cold outside.

I was reminded of the temps when the Lebanon Fire Department put out a news release about cooling areas.

These locations will be open for the public to beat the heat, today through Friday:

Lynn Kelley, of Quechee, left, and Rodney Eldred, of Tunbridge, right, at the Kilton Library on Sept. 10, 2015. (Valley News – James M. Patterson) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

Lebanon residents will also have free access to the Lebanon Pool from Tuesday through Friday, according to the news release.

They will be required to show ID as proof of residence.

POOL HOURS
Monday through Saturday:
Adult Lap Swim (Ages 18+): Noon to 1 p.m.
Open Swim (All Ages): 1 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.
Family Swim and Adults: 4:10 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Ages 13 and under must have adult supervision during Family Swim.

Last but not least, Lebanon fire officials reminded folks that “anyone requiring immediate assistance or suffering a heat emergency should call 911 immediately,” and information on staying safe in the heat can be found at https://lebanonnh.gov/381/Summer-Safety.