A Valley News Publication

There’s gonna be a meteor shower this weekend, and here’s how you can watch

The Perseid (that’s “Purse-y-id,” according to NASA) meteor showers are set to peak this weekend, offering ample opportunities for viewing, according to Time Magazine. Here, a quick guide.

WHEN TO WATCH

Time reports the best times to see the meteor showers are Saturday and Sunday nights, when you should be able to see 60-70 meteors per hour.

Some meteors will appear lower in the sky as soon as it’s fully dark out—around 9:30 p.m. local time. But the best time to watch the shower is in the pre-dawn hours of 3-5 a.m. when the moon has set and Perseus is high in the sky.

HOW TO WATCH

If you want to take see the meteor show, you should aim to head somewhere super dark and free of light pollution or large buildings, according to the article. “No special equipment is needed, just patience,” Time reported.

Of course, if you prefer to view from the comfort of your own home or already have plans and might miss the show, you can catch the live stream here on Youtube.

HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH THE METEOR SHOWERS

This is where it gets a little tricky, and where some equipment might be necessary. (You probably won’t capture this lights show on your iPhone.) From the article:

Anyone using a real camera should consider setting it up on a tripod in order to avoid the blurry shots that can result from shaky hands. For best results, aim your camera toward Perseus, manually focus a wide-angle lens, use a remote shutter release or self-timer, and employ NASA’s 500 rule to calculate the optimal exposure time.

If anyone does snap pics of the shower, send ’em our way!

FILE – In this Thursday night, Dec. 13, 2012, file photo, a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Geminid meteor shower over Springville, Ala. The Geminids meteor shower hits its peak on Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, but a full moon will outshine the celestial show this year. (Mark Almond/AL.com via AP, File)

If you know where to buy a jet pack in the UV, please help this guy out

From the Upper Valley (VT/NH) Facebook page.

From the Upper Valley (VT/NH) Facebook page.

Upper Valley resident Joe Honkala put out a call on Facebook this week for jet packs, and the internet delivered.

Helpful suggestions included Michael’s (“They have everything!”), Listen and of course, Dan and Whit’s (remember, if they don’t have it, you don’t need it).

Facebook user Andy Martin highlighted the area’s lack of jet-pack amenities: “What the Upper Valley really needs is a jet pack re-fueling station,” he said in the comments.

If I were Joe, I’d try Amazon.

Astronauts will watch ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ in space

Nah, man, it’s happening. You can thank technology.

The Washington Post reported on Wednesday that NASA astronauts about the International Space Station will be treated to a screening of the latest Star Wars film, which is due to release in theaters on Friday.

Very few details are available, but NASA spokesman Daniel Huot confirmed that the International Space Station crew will watch The Last Jedi in orbit. There’s no timeline yet on when the screening will be.

Do you think they have to worry about spoilers in space? #deepthoughts

Either way, it’s pretty cool. I’ll bet the astronauts are pumped.

Attn: Meterorite *not* to blame for massive fire in Woodstock, N.H.

Just in case there was any doubt. We like to set the record straight, and so do our friends at the Concord Monitor.

A brush fire that ignited on Tuesday morning in Woodstock, N.H., has now burned more than 20 acres, according to The Associated Press. Crews still are working to extinguish the flames, but that effort could take several days.
The cause of the fire remains unclear, but one popular theory was that it had been caused by a meteor. While that sounds totally wild (and kind of how the apocalypse starts, tbh), it’s highly unlikely and also probably not true in this case, per science.